Activating One’s Moral Compass – Part 1 of 3 series

opened bible on wooden surfaca
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I am an old soul who was brought up in a typically strict household. Don’t get me wrong when I said “strict,” this does not mean that we get to be whipped for committing mistakes. Not that type of strict household but a more serious one, when Grandma would educate us on the consequences of our errors. She would even lecture us, myself especially, what would have happened if I continue being naughty, what’s going to happen if I skipped meals, naps or just completely ignore her discipline.

Indeed, my younger self was thankful for being disciplined according to the mores of the society. Home discipline back in the early 80’s was a substantial ingredient to personal growth, that’s why the saying “charity begins at home” transcends essential values to our social survival. Our elders were there for a reason. They have had bad experiences in life, regretted every wrongdoing they have done years ago, that because of these terrible experiences, they felt their moral obligation to teach us the importance of “learning from our mistakes.” Yes, if there would be an opportunity to take back time, I am pretty sure that they will not waste a second to get back on track in their lives before they leave.

My younger self may have not fully comprehended why adults acted weird or talked so much before. But there was no need for that because Grandma tried her best to share her simple reasons why she acted like that, or said this or that. Sure, it’s not always a pleasing discipline for sometimes a stick was necessary but she made sure that we were aware of her reasons, thereby, setting our expectations and letting us know of the possible consequences if we chose otherwise.

Parents tend to pass their values to their children. I am sure that while I was learning from my Grandma, my mother too had her share of moments with her. Learning that “process” helped me build my own moral compass and this helped me gauge my freewill as well. I think that this was the reason why it is critical for parents to be with their children during their formative years because whatever installed in us, will last a lifetime. Our moral compass will help us while growing up, decipher what is right and what is wrong and then finally come up with a decision we may be thankful for or regret at a later stage.

moral compass

a natural feeling that makes people know what is right and wrong and how they should behave –Cambridge Dictionary (online)

We are all voyagers of life. Eventually, life’s challenges may pose a great threat to our well-being. We might forget to check if we are acting correctly in life or if there are more compromises than before. We might even miss to check our moral compass if it was as sensitive as it was years ago. Sometimes, we tend to feel numb when pain is too much to bear. At times, when we explore too much, we might lose our individuality and give in too many compromises which we may or may not regret soon enough.

Whatever be the case, if our moral compass is left unchecked, we might not be able to get back on track sooner than expected. As you know, once a soul lost its ways, the chances of finding its way back would be difficult unless someone from our circle of influence may offer his/her best assistance and help us go through our situation. Sure, we do not want to be just too accepting that we let others dictate our lives and decide for ourselves. We also would never want to live on someone’s shadows to keep us alive. That’s not living, at all.

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